ArrayFire Capability Update - July 2014

Oded Android, ArrayFire, C/C++, CUDA, Fortran, JAVA, OpenCL, R 1 Comment

In response to user requests for additional ArrayFire capabilities, we have decided to extend the library to have CPU fall back when OpenCL drivers for CPUs are not available. This means that ArrayFire code will be portable to both devices that have OpenCL setup and devices without it. This is done through the creation of additional backends. This will allow ArrayFire users to write their code once and have it run on multiple systems. We currently support the following systems and architectures: NVIDIA GPUs (Tesla, Fermi, and Kepler) AMD's GPUs, CPUs and APUs Intel's CPUs, GPUs and Xeon Phi Co-Processor Mobile and Embedded devices As part of this update process we are also looking at extending ArrayFire capabilities to low power systems such ...

OpenCL on Mobile Devices

Pavan Android, OpenCL 5 Comments

While Google has openly displayed its opposition to OpenCL, many hardware manufacturers seem to be putting their weight behind OpenCL. Qualcomm, ARM, Imagination and Vivante support OpenCL on their GPUs. Android Phone manufacturers - Samsung, HTC, Sony and Amazon - ship OpenCL drivers and libraries on their latest generation of devices. Considering the prevalence of OpenCL on shipped devices, it is likely most Renderscript implementations have an OpenCL backend. To consolidate a list of OpenCL supported Android devices, we created a publicly accessable Google document seen below. If you have an Android phone that is not listed, we'd appreciate it if you contributed to the list. To test if OpenCL is supported on your phone, you can use OpenCL Info ...

Getting Started with OpenCL on Android

Pradeep Android, JAVA, OpenCL 10 Comments

Mobile devices are carving their niche into the world of computing with more processing power day by day. GPUs on mobile devices have been around for a while, but using them for accelerating computation is still quite new. Until recently, the only way to access the GPU was through OpenGL. Around december 2008, Khronos released OpenCL, a generic API for accelerating non-graphics tasks. OpenCL enables us to take advantage of acceleration hardware. Since it is an open standard, many hardware vendors provide support on their devices. With the recent release of Adreno and Mali SDKs, you can now run OpenCL code on mobile GPUs. Today's post is going to be about how to do image processing on camera feed on ...