Finger Vein Identity Recognition in "Negligible Time" using ArrayFire

John Melonakos ArrayFire, Case Studies, Computer Vision, CUDA, Open Source Leave a Comment

In this blog post, we summarize work by researchers in Slovakia using ArrayFire to develop OpenFinger, a finger vein identity recognition library. Finger prints and finger veins can be used as a biometric for identity recognition. The physical setup of their sensor system is the following collection of CMOS sensors scattering light to a near infrared LED that projects the image to a CCD camera for capture to a computer. The computing infrastructure used in this work consists of the following components. Several great open source libraries are used, including OpenCV, Caffe, Qt, and ArrayFire. ArrayFire is specifically used in pre-processing to accelerate Gabor filtering on the GPU. Gabor filter has proven itself as one of the most suitable techniques ...

Bringing Together the GPU Computing Ecosystem for Python

John Melonakos Announcements, ArrayFire, Computing Trends, CUDA, Open Source, Python Leave a Comment

To date, we have not done a lot for the Python ecosystem. A few months ago, we decided it was time to change that. Like NVIDIA said in this post, the current slate of GPU tools available to Python developers is scattered. With some attention to community building, perhaps we can build something better -- together. NVIDIA spoke some about its plans to help cleanup the ecosystem. We're onboard with that mentality and have two ways we propose to contribute: We're working on a survey paper that assesses the state of the ecosystem. What technical computing things can you do with each package? What benchmarks result from the packages on real Python user code? What plans does each group have ...

Cycling through SYCL

Umar Arshad C/C++, Computing Trends, Open Source, OpenCL Leave a Comment

We recently gave an overview of recent history in the technical computing hardware market. In it, we mention the energy at Intel right now. The weight of Intel is behind the SYCL standard through its new software approach, oneAPI. SYCL is a cross-platform API that targets heterogeneous hardware, similar to OpenCL and CUDA. The SYCL standard was first introduced by Codeplay and is now being managed by the Khronos group. It allows single-source compilation in C++ to target multiple devices on a system, rather than using C++ for the host and domain specific kernel languages for the device. Furthermore, SYCL is fully C++ 17 standards compliant. You don't have any extensions to the language that would prevent any standards compliant ...

The Roaring 20s in AI & Technical Computing

John Melonakos ArrayFire, Computing Trends, Open Source Leave a Comment

Since ArrayFire was founded in 2007, there has been an explosion in software and its importance to our lives. Computers, connected to sensors and real-world outcomes, do really cool things that touch nearly every aspect of our lives. I believe these are exciting times for technical computing and for HPC, as evidenced by the things showcased this week at SC 2020. While ArrayFire focuses purely on software, our hardware partners turn our imaginative lines of code into real-world applications. AMD, NVIDIA, and Intel have each evolved tremendously since we started ArrayFire. Over a decade ago, NVIDIA and its CEO-founder Jensen saw the opportunity to teach the world a new heterogeneous model of computing that overwhelmingly convinces scientists, engineers, and analysts ...

ArrayFire v3.5 Official Release

Umar Arshad Announcements, ArrayFire, CUDA, Open Source, OpenCL 1 Comment

Today we are pleased to announce the release of ArrayFire v3.5, our open source library of parallel computing functions supporting CUDA, OpenCL, and CPU devices. This new version of ArrayFire improves features and performance for applications in machine learning, computer vision, signal processing, statistics, finance, and more. This release focuses on thread-safety, support for simple sparse-dense arithmetic operations, canny edge detector function, and a genetic algorithm example. A complete list of ArrayFire v3.5 updates and new features are found in the product Release Notes. Thread Safety ArrayFire now supports threading programming models. This is not intended to improve the performance since most of the parallelism is happening on the device, but it does allow you to use multiple devices in ...

Using GPUs in KVM Virtual Machines

Pavan Hardware, Infrastructure, Open Source 2 Comments

Introduction A couple of months ago, I began investigating GPU passthrough on my workstation to test ArrayFire on different operating systems. Around the same time, we at ArrayFire found ourselves with a few surplus GPUs. Having had great success with my virtualization efforts, we decided to build a Virtualized GPU Server to utilize these GPUs. Building a Virtualized GPU Server alleviated one of the pain points at our company: We no longer need to swap GPUs or Hard Disks to test a new environment. To maximize the number of GPUs we can put in a machine, we ended up getting a Quantum TXR430-0768R from Exxact Computing which comes in a 4U form factor and supports upto 8x double width GPUs. ...

Contributors: A big benefit to open source software

Brian Kloppenborg ArrayFire, Open Source 4 Comments

Making the decision to open source your software is not an easy process. Indeed, here at ArrayFire our choice to release ArrayFire under the open source, commercially friendly, BSD 3-Clause License came only after many hours of consideration and philosophical discussion (e.g. see our CEO's blog on these topics). Thus far this decision has proven to be strictly beneficial to our company. The impact of third-party contributions Although ArrayFire is primarily developed by our engineers, there are several contributions from other developers. Therefore we feel particularly compelled to elucidate how these contributions have improved the ArrayFire ecosystem. Packaging for Linux and OSX One of the best parts of open source distribution is that your code can be packaged and distributed for ...

ArrayFire v3.0 is here!

Aaron Announcements, ArrayFire, CUDA, Open Source, OpenCL 5 Comments

Today we are pleased to announce the release of ArrayFire v3.0. This new version features major changes to ArrayFire’s visualization library, a new CPU backend, and dense linear algebra for OpenCL devices. It also includes improvements across the board for ArrayFire’s OpenCL backend. A complete list ArrayFire v3.0 updates and new features can be found in the product Release Notes. With over 8 years of continuous development, the open source ArrayFire library is the top CUDA and OpenCL software library. ArrayFire supports CUDA-capable GPUs, OpenCL devices, and other accelerators. With its easy-to-use API, this hardware-neutral software library is designed for maximum speed without the hassle of writing time-consuming CUDA and OpenCL device code. With ArrayFire’s library functions, developers can maximize ...

ArrayFire Open Source Buzz

Aaron ArrayFire, Open Source 3 Comments

Over the weekend we celebrated the month-iversary of ArrayFire going open source. A month later, we're still pumped about this move, and the response from the parallel computing community has been tremendous. We thought we'd share some of our favorite ArrayFire buzz from the last month. On the day of the release, we watched as the ArrayFire open source release steadily climbed up Hacker News, eventually landing the number three spot! Admittedly, it's hard to compete with a comet landing. We are living one of the coolest moments ever in the history of @arrayfire! We just open sourced & are at #3 on HN, pic.twitter.com/NxwoO2sQqL — John Melonakos (@melonakos) November 12, 2014   With eager eyes we followed the rise ...

Conway's Game of Life using ArrayFire

Shehzan ArrayFire, CUDA, Image Processing, Open Source, OpenGL 4 Comments

Conway's Game of Life is a popular zero player cellular automaton devised by the John Horton Conway in 1970. The game makes for a fun evolution as the player sets the initial condition and then observes the evolution of the game. Each cell has 2 states: live or dead. There are 4 simple rules that determine this: Any live cell with fewer than two live neighbours dies, as if caused by under-population. Any live cell with two or three live neighbours lives on to the next generation. Any live cell with more than three live neighbours dies, as if by overcrowding. Any dead cell with exactly three live neighbours becomes a live cell, as if by reproduction. From a programmer's ...